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AUGUST 12,2017 OUR GROUP 23 OF MORNING HOTSHOTS

AUGUST 12,2017 OUR GROUP 23 OF MORNING HOTSHOTS
DAILY
 
GRATEFUL FOR WHAT I HAVE 
During this process of learning more about humility, the most profound result of all was the change in our attitude toward God.
TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 75 
Today my prayers consist mostly of saying thank you to my Higher Power for my sobriety and for the wonder of God’s abundance, but I need to ask also for help and the power to carry out His will for me.  I no longer need God each minute to rescue me from the situations I get myself into by not doing His will. Now my gratitude seems to be directly linked to humility.  As long as I have the humility to be grateful for what I have, God continues to provide for me. 
Copyright 1990 
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS WORLD SERVICES, INC.
==================
VERNON HOWARD
 
“An awakened man is a mental magician in the authentic meaning of
that phrase. He could meet any stranger on the street and tell him
a thousand facts about his psychic condition. For instance, he knows
that when that stranger screams for something it is not the object
that he values but the scream. But this magical insight has no value
to the unawakened man because of his inability and his refusal to
listen to it. He is like a man who refuses to move out of a building
condemned by the city inspector because he _calls_ it his castle.”
700 Inspiring Guides To A New Life, # 461
==================
DAILY REFLECTIONS AUGUST 12
A LOOK BACKWARD
First, we take a look backward and try to discover where we have been at fault; next we make a vigorous attempt to repair the damage we have done; . . .
— TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 77
As a traveler on a fresh and exciting A.A. journey of recovery, I experienced a newfound peace of mind and the horizon appeared clear and bright, rather than obscure and dim. Reviewing my life to discover where I had been at fault seemed to be such an arduous and dangerous task. It was painful to pause and look backward. I was afraid I might stumble! Couldn’t I put the past out of my mind and just live in my new golden present? I realized that those in the past whom I had harmed stood between me and my desire to continue my movement toward serenity. I had to ask for courage to face those persons from my life who still lived in my conscience, to recognize and deal with the guilt that their presence produced in me. I had to look at the damage I had done, and become willing to make amends. Only then could my journey of the spirit resume.
From the book Daily Reflections
Copyright © 1990 by Alcoholics
Anonymous World Services, Inc.
==================
“Prepare your mind to receive the best that life has to offer.” 
― Ernest Holmes
 
I went to AA and everyone talked about God and 
I thought, they all talk about God and ‘there must be something to that’. 
Anonymous 
 
“You’re all geniuses, and you’re all beautiful.
You don’t need anyone to tell you who you are.
You are what you are.
Get out there and get peace, think peace,
and live peace and breathe peace,
and you’ll get it as soon as you like.”
John Lennon

I have phrases and whole pages memorized,
but nothing can be told of love.
You must wait until you and I
are living together.
In the conversation we’ll have 
then…be patient…then.
From Essential Rumi
by Coleman Barks


A COURSE IN MIRACLES AUGUST 12, 2017
ACIM Workbook Lesson 224 Insights
“God is my Father, and He loves His Son.”
Since God is Love and He is my Father, my true Identity must be Love. Love is God’s gift to me. By Its nature, Love must be extended to be Itself. That is why my true Identity (Love) is the gift I give to the world. Only Love is real. So Love is, in truth, all there is to give. Love is the Light of Heaven and the Light of the world. My job is to see that Light of Love in everyone, everywhere, all the time. The Light of Love is all there really is to see. If I think I see something else, I am hallucinating, or projecting something that is not there.
 
The moment I recognize I am seeing anything other than Love, it is time for me to turn to the Holy Spirit and give this false perception to Him. That is the essence of daily practice that leads me Home to Heaven, where I am perfectly safe, at peace and in joy.
 
If I am seeing anyone as threatening to me or disturbing to me in any way, I need to remind myself that I must be seeing wrongly, for Love does not attack by seeing separation. Love only blesses by knowing Oneness. The true Identity of everyone is Love, so the truth of everyone only gives the blessing of Love.
 
In this dream, it appears there are alternatives to Love, but this cannot be in truth. As it says in the introduction to the Course, “Nothing real can be threatened. Nothing unreal exists. Herein lies the peace of God.” Only Love is real. That is my true Identity, along with everyone’s.
 
Holy Spirit, help me today to look past the false masks to the true Identity in everyone, that I may recognize my Own.
 
In this lesson, Jesus reminds me of my true Identity, Which I have forgotten. He encourages me to accept my true Identity and let the false identity go. Today is a practice in accepting my true Identity. Today is a practice in remembering I am still Love, as God created me. Today is a day of practice in not making the false identity — a body with a separate mind — real. Today is a day of practice in being willing to watch the thoughts I am believing in and, if it does not reflect my true Identity, to take it to the Holy Spirit to be undone.
 
Today is a day of accepting my Source instead of rejecting It. God is my Source. God is Love and therefore Love is my Source. I am an extension of Love and so I cannot be anything other than Love. Anything else is an hallucination. Holy Spirit, help me rest today in the remembrance that I am only Love. Let me be willing to remember the truth. Let me be willing to remember Love and that only Love is real.
 
This is a good lesson for me today. Yesterday someone offered me some guilt and I accepted it. The guilt made me feel like a bad person. If I feel guilty, obviously it is because I did something wrong. Since there is nothing I can do to fix the situation, I started feeling anxious and frustrated. This is such a typical ego maneuver — putting me in a box where there seems to be no way out.
 
Thank God I know now that I can take this to Holy Spirit and ask Him for a different way to see it. When I allow my mind to get so cluttered with these ego thoughts of guilt, fear and blame that I can’t see past them, I completely lose sight of the fact that there could be another way to see it.
 
If, instead, I can focus on Truth, like today’s lesson, “God is my Father and He loves His Son, ” then I can relax and let Holy Spirit guide me out of the scary place I put myself. I look back at it from the safety of God’s Love and I laugh that I was frightened by something so insubstantial.
© 2003, Pathways of Light. http://pathwaysoflight.org
You may freely share copies of this with your friends,
provided this copyright notice and website address are included.
========================
There are people who depict their Creator as one who imperiously tests man with the smoke of ignorance and the fire of punishment, and who judges man’s actions with heartless scrutiny. They thus distort the true concept of God as a loving, compassionate Heavenly Father into a false image of one who is a strict, unsparing, and vengeful tyrant. But devotees who commune with God know it is foolish to think of Him otherwise than as the Compassionate Being who is the infinite receptacle of all love and goodness.
Paramahansa Yogananda
 
 
A child in the woods 
Why thousands of teens ran away from home in the 1960s
The Beatles’ She’s Leaving Home captures a moment in the late 1960s when thousands of young people fled their homes to live in Utopian communities.
Benjamin Ramm looks back.
By Benjamin 15 June 2017
Fifty years ago, a song topped the UK charts that expressed the fears of a generation of parents. She’s Leaving Home by The Beatles tells the story of a girl who runs away abruptly, leaving only “the note that she hoped would say more”, and of her parents’ shock and sadness at awaking to her absence. It is based on the true story of Melanie Coe, a teenager from north London, whose account is told in counterpoint to the laments of her parents: “we gave her most of our lives / sacrificed most of our lives / we gave her everything money could buy”.
The song succeeds in capturing the trauma of the ‘generation gap’, which was particularly acute during the late 1960s. Although overshadowed by more catchy and colourful tracks, She’s Leaving Home has an abiding resonance, in part because it helps us understand the lack of mutual understanding. Conceived by Paul McCartney, the ‘Greek chorus’ of sorrow was added by John Lennon, “based on typical sayings of his Aunt Mimi”.
Daily Mail
The disappearance of Melanie Coe, who ran away from home at the age of 17 in 1967, captivated the UK tabloids (Credit: The Daily Mail)
The teenager in the song feels “something inside that was always denied for so many years”, and Coe later told the press that “as a 17-year-old I had everything money could buy – diamonds, furs, a car – but my father and mother never once told me they loved me”. Like Simon & Garfunkel’s 1966 song Richard Cory, She’s Leaving Home explores the disconnect between wealth and happiness (“what did we do that was wrong? / we didn’t know it was wrong / fun is the one thing that money can’t buy”).
Alarming tales of runaways filled the tabloids – Paul McCartney read about Coe’s case in the Daily Mirror, and has said that “there were a lot of those [stories] at the time”. For Karen Staller, author of the book Runaways, 1967 was the “crisis year”, when panic gripped the media. Children who once played on the streets now drifted into areas associated with the counterculture, such as New York City’s East Village or San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district during the ’67 Summer of Love.
Hippies sit in a doorway in the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco – an area associated strongly the counterculture in 1969 when the picture was taken (Credit: Alamy)
In her essay Slouching Towards Bethlehem, the writer Joan Didion recalls seeing a notice on Haight street in the late spring of 1967, which began: 
Last Easter Day
My Christopher Robin wandered away.
He called April 10th
But he hasn’t called since
He said he was coming home
But he hasn’t shown.
Children of the revolution
Between 1967 and 1971, over 500,000 people in the US left home to move into experimental communities. In San Francisco, a group called the Diggers (named after the agrarian socialists during the English civil war) offered social services and emotional support to runaways. In the context of war in Vietnam, a runaway – like a draft-dodger or prisoner – acquired a political status, regardless of their motivation. 
Widespread concern reached the US Congress, resulting in the Runaway Youth Act of 1974
Widespread public concern about this phenomenon soon reached Congress, resulting in the Runaway Youth Act of 1974. San Francisco had drawn disillusioned youth from around the country, including a set of largely suburban students who formed an urban guerilla group called the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA).One of them was Emily Harris, a successful student from conservative rural Indiana. A few days before the SLA’s notorious kidnapping of Patty Hearst in February 1974, Harris wrote a letter to her parents attempting to explain her radical departure.
Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover
She’s Leaving Home appears on The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2017 (Credit: Alamy)
“I see suffering all around me,” she wrote. “These are realities which exist and which you have chosen to ignore in your life. These realities exist because some people insist on being rich regardless of whether they must utilize the blood and sweat of others. I do not see my freedom and happiness as something that comes when I grab as much as I can from someone else. This means that I can no longer relate to the aspirations you have for creating a comfortable life for yourselves because they ignore the tortured lives that others lead in an attempt to survive.”
The final paragraph of Harris’ letter is illuminating of the chasm of inter-generational understanding:
“I love you because of the independence you gave me in the past to get to the point where I am now, but I realize we are headed in totally opposite directions and we can never hope to turn those around and go back towards a point in the past where we had something in common.” She concludes: “My love for you has not changed, it’s just that my love for other people and purposes has far exceeded it. Goodbye with the past, forward with the future.”
For the activists of the New Left, the past was irredeemably tainted by oppressive forces: society has to be reconstructed from the bottom up. The new egalitarian community would be free of hierarchy, patriarchy, racism and the ‘false needs’ of consumerism and organised religion. The ‘replacement society’ would eliminate alienation and provide community for young people who, like the teenager in She’s Leaving Home, felt they were “living alone for so many years”.
In with the new
At the heart of this vision was an unprecedented attack on the nuclear family – as an incubator of oppression in the name of social order. The philosophy of ‘free love’ was not mere libertinism: it expressed a rebellion against the ‘chains’ of monogamy. As consumerism created envy, so monogamy repressed desire, created neuroses, and enslaved women in the home. Rather than inheriting social bonds, the communes imagined creating their own identities.
These communities sought to exist beyond the legal reach and morals of capitalist society
These communities sought to exist beyond the legal reach and morals of capitalist society. A stark artistic expression of this is the 1973 film The Wicker Man, based on the 1967 novel Ritual by David Pinner. In a Celtic cult in the Scottish Hebrides, ‘free love’ is celebrated as a religious rite, with an ideal of pagan liberty opposed to Christian orthodoxy.
The Wicker Man
The 1973 film The Wicker Man explores the allure – and dark underside – of alternative communities (Credit: Alamy)
The ‘back-to-the-land’ movement conceived of itself as returning to an ideal of the past, in which man lived in harmony with nature. In an attempt to reflect this equilibrium, some of the communes adopted the design of Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome – beautiful spheres in which fragile parts stabilised each other to make a strong whole. In organisational terms, the communes sought to mimic this notion of “the organism of many who act as one”, in the words of member Molly Hollenbach.
Yet as Adam Curtis has shown, this “organic balance” proved to be a poor model of governance, and the communes reverted not to natural justice but to a state of nature. By rejecting the coercive culture of laws, the communes removed rules that restrained human behaviour, and strong personalities came to dominate. The communes ended up recreating some of the paternalistic dynamics that the runaways sought to escape.
Buckminster Fuller
The geodesic dome designed by Buckminster Fuller (pictured) reflects the equilibrium sought in communal living, with fragile parts stabilised in a strong whole (Credit: Alamy)
Back in the Bay Area, the SLA were attempting to ‘live the revolution’ – sharing everything from kitchen chores to a communal toothbrush. But their experiment in free love soon disillusioned female comrades such as Emily Harris. Freed of the straitjacket of monogamy, they found themselves enslaved to the libido of the dominant men – instead of having one master, a female comrade had many. (She did not have to consent, but as Hearst later wrote, “it was ‘comradely’ to say yes”).
Even after the communes were dissolved, their radical designs endured – and fuelled the corporate forces that they once opposed. In 2016, both Apple and Google revealed plans for new headquarters in Silicon Valley, with designs strikingly evocative of an earlier vision of the future. This shift from counterculture to cyberculture was incubated by Stewart Brand’s influential Whole Earth Catalog, published regularly between 1968-71. Steve Jobs described the Catalog as “Google in paperback form”, and its offices were housed in a moveable geodesic dome. This style became known as ‘hippie modernism’, defined by soft and circular shapes, in contrast to the hard-edged, inflexible buildings associated with bureaucratic modernism. But while Apple and Google’s plans adopt the designs of free communal association, their spaces are privatised – a commons only for the few.
For the runaways, liberation was closely tied to a social vision of the self, in a community away from the trappings of family life and private property. For a sense of how far some strayed from this vision, look no further than the subject of She’s Leaving Home. Fifty years on, Melanie Coe is married with two children. The runaway now runs an estate agency.
If you would like to comment on this story or anything else you have seen on BBC Culture, head over to our Facebook page or message us on Twitter.
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Sincerely,
Ron Richey
545 Queen St. #701
Honolulu, Hi 96813
 
 
 
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A child in the woods (Credit: Alamy)

 

 

Why thousands of teens ran away from home in the 1960s

The Beatles’ She’s Leaving Home captures a moment in the late 1960s when thousands of young people fled their homes to live in Utopian communities. Benjamin Ramm looks back.

Fifty years ago, a song topped the UK charts that expressed the fears of a generation of parents. She’s Leaving Home by The Beatles tells the story of a girl who runs away abruptly, leaving only “the note that she hoped would say more”, and of her parents’ shock and sadness at awaking to her absence. It is based on the true story of Melanie Coe, a teenager from north London, whose account is told in counterpoint to the laments of her parents: “we gave her most of our lives / sacrificed most of our lives / we gave her everything money could buy”.

The song succeeds in capturing the trauma of the ‘generation gap’, which was particularly acute during the late 1960s. Although overshadowed by more catchy and colourful tracks, She’s Leaving Home has an abiding resonance, in part because it helps us understand the lack of mutual understanding. Conceived by Paul McCartney, the ‘Greek chorus’ of sorrow was added by John Lennon, “based on typical sayings of his Aunt Mimi”.

Daily Mail

The disappearance of Melanie Coe, who ran away from home at the age of 17 in 1967, captivated the UK tabloids (Credit: The Daily Mail)

The teenager in the song feels “something inside that was always denied for so many years”, and Coe later told the press that “as a 17-year-old I had everything money could buy – diamonds, furs, a car – but my father and mother never once told me they loved me”. Like Simon & Garfunkel’s 1966 song Richard Cory, She’s Leaving Home explores the disconnect between wealth and happiness (“what did we do that was wrong? / we didn’t know it was wrong / fun is the one thing that money can’t buy”).

Alarming tales of runaways filled the tabloids – Paul McCartney read about Coe’s case in the Daily Mirror, and has said that “there were a lot of those [stories] at the time”. For Karen Staller, author of the book Runaways, 1967 was the “crisis year”, when panic gripped the media. Children who once played on the streets now drifted into areas associated with the counterculture, such as New York City’s East Village or San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district during the ’67 Summer of Love.

Hippies sit in a doorway

Hippies sit in a doorway in the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco – an area associated strongly the counterculture in 1969 when the picture was taken (Credit: Alamy)

In her essay Slouching Towards Bethlehem, the writer Joan Didion recalls seeing a notice on Haight street in the late spring of 1967, which began: 

Last Easter Day
My Christopher Robin wandered away.
He called April 10th
But he hasn’t called since
He said he was coming home
But he hasn’t shown.

Children of the revolution

Between 1967 and 1971, over 500,000 people in the US left home to move into experimental communities. In San Francisco, a group called the Diggers (named after the agrarian socialists during the English civil war) offered social services and emotional support to runaways. In the context of war in Vietnam, a runaway – like a draft-dodger or prisoner – acquired a political status, regardless of their motivation. 

Widespread concern reached the US Congress, resulting in the Runaway Youth Act of 1974

Widespread public concern about this phenomenon soon reached Congress, resulting in the Runaway Youth Act of 1974. San Francisco had drawn disillusioned youth from around the country, including a set of largely suburban students who formed an urban guerilla group called the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA).One of them was Emily Harris, a successful student from conservative rural Indiana. A few days before the SLA’s notorious kidnapping of Patty Hearst in February 1974, Harris wrote a letter to her parents attempting to explain her radical departure.

Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover

She’s Leaving Home appears on The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2017 (Credit: Alamy)

“I see suffering all around me,” she wrote. “These are realities which exist and which you have chosen to ignore in your life. These realities exist because some people insist on being rich regardless of whether they must utilize the blood and sweat of others. I do not see my freedom and happiness as something that comes when I grab as much as I can from someone else. This means that I can no longer relate to the aspirations you have for creating a comfortable life for yourselves because they ignore the tortured lives that others lead in an attempt to survive.”

The final paragraph of Harris’ letter is illuminating of the chasm of inter-generational understanding:

“I love you because of the independence you gave me in the past to get to the point where I am now, but I realize we are headed in totally opposite directions and we can never hope to turn those around and go back towards a point in the past where we had something in common.” She concludes: “My love for you has not changed, it’s just that my love for other people and purposes has far exceeded it. Goodbye with the past, forward with the future.”

For the activists of the New Left, the past was irredeemably tainted by oppressive forces: society has to be reconstructed from the bottom up. The new egalitarian community would be free of hierarchy, patriarchy, racism and the ‘false needs’ of consumerism and organised religion. The ‘replacement society’ would eliminate alienation and provide community for young people who, like the teenager in She’s Leaving Home, felt they were “living alone for so many years”.

In with the new

At the heart of this vision was an unprecedented attack on the nuclear family – as an incubator of oppression in the name of social order. The philosophy of ‘free love’ was not mere libertinism: it expressed a rebellion against the ‘chains’ of monogamy. As consumerism created envy, so monogamy repressed desire, created neuroses, and enslaved women in the home. Rather than inheriting social bonds, the communes imagined creating their own identities.

These communities sought to exist beyond the legal reach and morals of capitalist society

These communities sought to exist beyond the legal reach and morals of capitalist society. A stark artistic expression of this is the 1973 film The Wicker Man, based on the 1967 novel Ritual by David Pinner. In a Celtic cult in the Scottish Hebrides, ‘free love’ is celebrated as a religious rite, with an ideal of pagan liberty opposed to Christian orthodoxy.

The Wicker Man

The 1973 film The Wicker Man explores the allure – and dark underside – of alternative communities (Credit: Alamy)

The ‘back-to-the-land’ movement conceived of itself as returning to an ideal of the past, in which man lived in harmony with nature. In an attempt to reflect this equilibrium, some of the communes adopted the design of Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome – beautiful spheres in which fragile parts stabilised each other to make a strong whole. In organisational terms, the communes sought to mimic this notion of “the organism of many who act as one”, in the words of member Molly Hollenbach.

Yet as Adam Curtis has shown, this “organic balance” proved to be a poor model of governance, and the communes reverted not to natural justice but to a state of nature. By rejecting the coercive culture of laws, the communes removed rules that restrained human behaviour, and strong personalities came to dominate. The communes ended up recreating some of the paternalistic dynamics that the runaways sought to escape.

Buckminster Fuller

The geodesic dome designed by Buckminster Fuller (pictured) reflects the equilibrium sought in communal living, with fragile parts stabilised in a strong whole (Credit: Alamy)

Back in the Bay Area, the SLA were attempting to ‘live the revolution’ – sharing everything from kitchen chores to a communal toothbrush. But their experiment in free love soon disillusioned female comrades such as Emily Harris. Freed of the straitjacket of monogamy, they found themselves enslaved to the libido of the dominant men – instead of having one master, a female comrade had many. (She did not have to consent, but as Hearst later wrote, “it was ‘comradely’ to say yes”).

Even after the communes were dissolved, their radical designs endured – and fuelled the corporate forces that they once opposed. In 2016, both Apple and Google revealed plans for new headquarters in Silicon Valley, with designs strikingly evocative of an earlier vision of the future. This shift from counterculture to cyberculture was incubated by Stewart Brand’s influential Whole Earth Catalog, published regularly between 1968-71. Steve Jobs described the Catalog as “Google in paperback form”, and its offices were housed in a moveable geodesic dome. This style became known as ‘hippie modernism’, defined by soft and circular shapes, in contrast to the hard-edged, inflexible buildings associated with bureaucratic modernism. But while Apple and Google’s plans adopt the designs of free communal association, their spaces are privatised – a commons only for the few.

For the runaways, liberation was closely tied to a social vision of the self, in a community away from the trappings of family life and private property. For a sense of how far some strayed from this vision, look no further than the subject of She’s Leaving Home. Fifty years on, Melanie Coe is married with two children. The runaway now runs an estate agency.

If you would like to comment on this story or anything else you have seen on BBC Culture, head over to our Facebook page or message us on Twitter.

And if you liked this story, sign up for the weekly bbc.com features newsletter, called “If You Only Read 6 Things This Week”. A handpicked selection of stories from BBC Future, Earth, Culture, Capital and Travel, delivered to your inbox every Friday.

 


— 
Sincerely,
Ron Richey
 545 Queen St.#701
Honolulu, Hi 96813

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