From the BlogMeet Ron

AUGUST 18,2017 OUR GROUP 23 OF MORNING HOTSHOTS

AUGUST 18,2017 OUR GROUP 23 OF MORNING HOTSHOTS
DAILY
 
Change
From “A New Man”:
“But the real miracle was what happened to him in the next ten years. He began helping people. I mean helping! No call has been too hard, too inconvenient, too ‘hopeless.’ He founded the A.A. group in his town, and he is embarrassed if you mention this to others or comment on the amount of A.A. work he is doing.  He is not the same man I was trying to twelfth-step. I failed in all my efforts to help the man I knew.  And then someone else provided a new man.”
Bernardsville, New Jersey, USA
1973 AAWS, Inc.
Came to Believe, 30th printing 2004, pg. 15
==================
VERNON HOWARD
 
“A chief wolf who lived in the woods one day called his pack of
friends together and the chief wolf stood up in front of them and
he said, ‘Good morning, I will now give you our morning sermon.’
And the chief wolf told the pack in front of him how they should
be kindly to other people. How they should love all the creatures
of the world, how they should be gentle and considerate and think
of other people. And as he made each point, all the wolves in the
congregation nodded their head and said, ‘Amen.’ (Audience Laughter)
 
And at the end of the sermon the chief wolf said, ‘Now ladies and
gentlemen, I would like to make one final announcement before we’re dismissed. I would like to announce that we will all gather back here at 7 p.m. in order to plan our attack, our attack on the sheep in the meadow.’ And all the wolves said, ‘Amen.’ (Audience laughter) And that’s what happened. At 7 o’clock they all came back and they planned their attack on the sheep in the meadow, which they carried out.
 
So this went on over the months and years. And watching this
at all times was a pair of wise old owls who were perched
on a branch nearby where they could see everything happening.
And one wise old owl said, ‘You know they’re just like human
beings. They say one thing but do another and they don’t see the contradiction. The other wise old owl said, ‘Yes, they’re as
schizophrenic as a bowl of split pea soup.’ (Audience laughter)
 
Am I reminding you of the world you live in? Am I reminding you
of the ideas that you have about being kind to people? And yet
you’re incapable of it. You’re incapable of being kind to other
people because that’s not your nature. Your nature isn’t to be
kind. It’s to attack. It’s to defend. It’s to be violent —
mentally at least, emotionally at least.”
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DAILY REFLECTIONS AUGUST 18
GETTING WELL
Very deep, sometimes quite forgotten, damaging emotional conflicts persist below the level of consciousness.
— TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, pp. 79-80
Only through positive action can I remove the remains of guilt and shame brought on by alcohol. Throughout my misadventures when I drank, my friends would say, “Why are you doing this? You’re only hurting yourself.” Little did I know how true were those words. Although I harmed others, some of my behavior caused grave wounds to my soul. Step Eight provides me with a way of forgiving myself. I alleviate much of the hidden damage when I make my list of those I have hurt. In making amends, I free myself of burdens, thus contributing to my healing.
From the book Daily Reflections
Copyright © 1990 by
Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
==================

“We need to know with scientific certainty that there is a Consciousness and a Power in the Universe that responds to us definitely, directly, and dynamically. Each individual must arrive at a place in his own consciousness where this contact is so immediate and so dynamic that if every other living soul denied it, he would still know.” 
― Ernest Holmes, Living the Science of Mind

I read every Bible several times, the Quran, 
the Kabbalah text and never found a religion 
that comes close to what I hear in these rooms. 
Anonymous 

🔰Life doesn’t hand us a handbook on how to live…but we are given free hand to write freely our own script, book or story– Our being as creators, writer, artist, actor, executive, director producer is within us and countless possibilities are birthed from that infinite world of our imagination! How awesome is that! And to that Love that you are far outshines the thoughts that one thinks or words that one may say, Write them down anyway〰〰✒ 
© John-Robert Coleman.2017

The Prophet said that women
totally dominate men of intellect and possessors of hearts, 
But ignorant men dominate women,
for they are shackled by the ferocity of animals.
–Rumi
 
 
A COURSE IN MIRACLES 
ACIM Workbook Lesson 231 Insights
“Father, I will but to remember You.”
The ego has a mistaken idea of what we are and what will bring us happiness. Centered on the idea of separation and the desire for specialness, the ego’s idea of Heaven is to be different, unique and to have more specialness than others.
 
But believing in separation brings with it a sense of loss because desiring specialness makes it impossible to experience Love, which can only be given equally to all. This sense of loss brings with it a sense of guilt because the belief is that we have done something that broke the flow of Love and therefore did harm.
 
Thus everyone in this world carries a burden of loss and guilt and is seeking to escape that burden. Constant effort is focused on trying to fill the emptiness and hide from the guilt. No one questions whether the emptiness and guilt are real. Having accepted that separation is real, the emptiness and guilt are inevitable. Our only apparent hope is to find temporary fixes in which we seem to have periods where the emptiness subsides and the guilt is hidden.
 
Yet because the underlying belief in separation remains, the guilt will resurface and the emptiness will return because their cause remains. The drive to win, to have more money, more friends, to look good, to have a special partner, to have status, are all just many forms of attempts to fill the illusion of emptiness with an illusion of specialness.
 
Acts of anger are just attempts to make others guilty to hide from the guilt believed to be within. Yet all attempts to project guilt simply attest to the belief that guilt is justified and keep it firmly rooted in the ego thought system. All this comes with the thought system of separation.
 
It is all undone when we remember Love and accept our unity with It. Underneath all our ego false ideas, we want to return to remembering Love, our Source. We were created by Love, in Love, as Love. In this Identity there can be no emptiness and there can be no guilt. Love is one and all the same. Within Love there can be no pockets of emptiness without Love. In Its unity is Its peace. Being one and the same, It cannot harm and so there can be no guilt in Love. This is the Heaven we seek. We need but accept that our will is one with God’s, that our only purpose is to extend Love, and we will be free.
 
I thank you, Father, for your Love for me. I thank you Father for your Guide, Who’s only purpose is to guide me back to you. I will but to remember You.
 
What does it take for me to remember Love, which is our Father? It takes a willingness to let go of what is not of our Father. The false ideas of the ego are myriad. Love, our Father, is one. Love is. God is. There is nothing else.
 
I lay the ego down by not making it real. I lay the ego down by listening to the Holy Spirit. It shows me the difference between the ego’s lies and Reality. The Holy Spirit brings me to the remembrance of Love, our Father.
 
Today I will step back and listen for the truth. Today I would follow, I would not lead. Today I would let God’s peace lead the way. Today I would focus on what is eternal.
© 2003, Pathways of Light. http://pathwaysoflight.org
You may freely share copies of this with your friends, provided this copyright notice and website address are included.
========================
“Retire to the center of your being, which is calmness.” 
― Paramahansa Yogananda
======================
Capitalism versus Democracy
‘Buchanan has developed a hidden programme for suppressing democracy on behalf of the very rich. It is now reshaping politics.’
 
A despot in disguise: one man’s mission to rip up democracy
George Monbiot
James McGill Buchanan’s vision of totalitarian capitalism has infected public policy in the US. Now it’s being exported
George Monbiot is a Guardian columnist
 
 
It’s the missing chapter: a key to understanding the politics of the past half century. To read Nancy MacLean’s new book, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America, is to see what was previously invisible.
 
The history professor’s work on the subject began by accident. In 2013 she stumbled across a deserted clapboard house on the campus of George Mason University in Virginia. It was stuffed with the unsorted archives of a man who had died that year whose name is probably unfamiliar to you: James McGill Buchanan. She says the first thing she picked up was a stack of confidential letters concerning millions of dollars transferred to the university by the billionaire Charles Koch.
 
 How corporate dark money is taking power on both sides of the Atlantic
George Monbiot
 Read more
Her discoveries in that house of horrors reveal how Buchanan, in collaboration with business tycoons and the institutes they founded, developed a hidden programme for suppressing democracy on behalf of the very rich. The programme is now reshaping politics, and not just in the US.
 
Buchanan was strongly influenced by both the neoliberalism of Friedrich Hayek and Ludwig von Mises, and the property supremacism of John C Calhoun, who argued in the first half of the 19th century that freedom consists of the absolute right to use your property (including your slaves) however you may wish; any institution that impinges on this right is an agent of oppression, exploiting men of property on behalf of the undeserving masses.
 
  James Buchanan brought these influences together to create what he called public choice theory. He argued that a society could not be considered free unless every citizen has the right to veto its decisions. What he meant by this was that no one should be taxed against their will. But the rich were being exploited by people who use their votes to demand money that others have earned, through involuntary taxes to support public spending and welfare. Allowing workers to form trade unions and imposing graduated income taxes were forms of “differential or discriminatory legislation” against the owners of capital.
 
Business Today: sign up for a morning shot of financial news
 Read more
Any clash between “freedom” (allowing the rich to do as they wish) and democracy should be resolved in favour of freedom. In his book The Limits of Liberty, he noted that “despotism may be the only organisational alternative to the political structure that we observe.” Despotism in defence of freedom.
 
His prescription was a “constitutional revolution”: creating irrevocable restraints to limit democratic choice. Sponsored throughout his working life by wealthy foundations, billionaires and corporations, he developed a theoretical account of what this constitutional revolution would look like, and a strategy for implementing it.
 
He explained how attempts to desegregate schooling in the American south could be frustrated by setting up a network of state-sponsored private schools. It was he who first proposed privatising universities, and imposing full tuition fees on students: his original purpose was to crush student activism. He urged privatisation of social security and many other functions of the state. He sought to break the links between people and government, and demolish trust in public institutions. He aimed, in short, to save capitalism from democracy.
 
In 1980, he was able to put the programme into action. He was invited to Chile, where he helped the Pinochet dictatorship write a new constitution, which, partly through the clever devices Buchanan proposed, has proved impossible to reverse entirely. Amid the torture and killings, he advised the government to extend programmes of privatisation, austerity, monetary restraint, deregulation and the destruction of trade unions: a package that helped trigger economic collapse in 1982.
 
None of this troubled the Swedish Academy, which through his devotee at Stockholm University Assar Lindbeck in 1986 awarded James Buchanan the Nobel memorial prize for economics. It is one of several decisions that have turned this prize toxic.
 
Koch network ‘piggy banks’ closed until Republicans pass health and tax reform
 
But his power really began to be felt when Koch, currently the seventh richest man in the US, decided that Buchanan held the key to the transformation he sought. Koch saw even such ideologues as Milton Friedman and Alan Greenspan as “sellouts”, as they sought to improve the efficiency of government rather than destroy it altogether. But Buchanan took it all the way.
 
MacLean says that Charles Koch poured millions into Buchanan’s work at George Mason University, whose law and economics departments look as much like corporate-funded thinktanks as they do academic faculties. He employed the economist to select the revolutionary “cadre” that would implement his programme (Murray Rothbard, at the Cato Institute that Koch founded, had urged the billionaire to study Lenin’s techniques and apply them to the libertarian cause). Between them, they began to develop a programme for changing the rules.
    
  The papers Nancy MacLean discovered show that Buchanan saw stealth as crucial. He told his collaborators that “conspiratorial secrecy is at all times essential”. Instead of revealing their ultimate destination, they would proceed by incremental steps. For example, in seeking to destroy the social security system, they would claim to be saving it, arguing that it would fail without a series of radical “reforms”. (The same argument is used by those attacking the NHS). Gradually they would build a “counter-intelligentsia”, allied to a “vast network of political power” that would become the new establishment.
 
Through the network of thinktanks that Koch and other billionaires have sponsored, through their transformation of the Republican party, and the hundreds of millions they have poured into state congressional and judicial races, through the mass colonisation of Trump’s administration by members of this network and lethally effective campaigns against everything from public health to action on climate change, it would be fair to say that Buchanan’s vision is maturing in the US.
 
 The Grenfell inquiry will be a stitch-up. Here’s why
George Monbiot
 
But not just there. Reading this book felt like a demisting of the window through which I see British politics. The bonfire of regulations highlighted by the Grenfell Tower disaster, the destruction of state architecture through austerity, the budgeting rules, the dismantling of public services, tuition fees and the control of schools: all these measures follow Buchanan’s programme to the letter. I wonder how many people are aware that David Cameron’s free schools project stands in a tradition designed to hamper racial desegregation in the American south.
 
  In one respect, Buchanan was right: there is an inherent conflict between what he called “economic freedom” and political liberty. Complete freedom for billionaires means poverty, insecurity, pollution and collapsing public services for everyone else. Because we will not vote for this, it can be delivered only through deception and authoritarian control. The choice we face is between unfettered capitalism and democracy. You cannot have both.
 
Buchanan’s programme is a prescription for totalitarian capitalism. And his disciples have only begun to implement it. But at least, thanks to MacLean’s discoveries, we can now apprehend the agenda. One of the first rules of politics is, know your enemy. We’re getting there.
 
Since you’re here …
… we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading the Guardian than ever but advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. And unlike many news organisations, we haven’t put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as open as we can. So you can see why we need to ask for your help. The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our perspective matters – because it might well be your perspective, too.
 
I appreciate there not being a paywall: it is more democratic for the media to be available for all and not a commodity to be purchased by a few. I’m happy to make a contribution so others with less means still have access to information.
Thomasine F-R.
 
Sincerely,
Ron Richey
 545 Queen St.#701
Honolulu, Hi 96813
808-734-5732

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