From the BlogMeet Ron

MAY 5,2016 MINDFUL MOMENTS IN MANOA

MAY 5,2016 MINDFUL MOMENTS IN MANOA
 
Honolulu folks –> Join a supportive group of like-minded folks tonight 5/5/16, for meditation and discussion at our place, 3241 Alani Drive, in Manoa, at the usual time: 6 to 7:30 PM. If you have a meditation cushion please bring; if not, no worries. The front door opens at 5:50. Note: please do not park in the driveway, as we share this rented house with another couple and we do not want them to be blocked in. Thanks!
 
 
One of my favorite poets once remarked that poetry is a “language against which we have no defense.”
 
For me, poetry can have the power to stun my distracted mind into a moment of wakefulness, to guide it into a place of vulnerability, where I have no defense.
 
William Stafford was a master stunner. His poems can sneak under enemy lines to interrogate the deep self.
 
This simple poem was written 26 days before he passed in 1993.
 
The Way It Is
There’s a thread you follow. It goes among
 
things that change. But it doesn’t change.
 
People wonder about what you are pursuing.
 
You have to explain about the thread.
 
But it is hard for others to see.
 
While you hold it you can’t get lost.
 
Tragedies happen; people get hurt
 
or die; and you suffer and get old.
 
Nothing you do can stop time’s unfolding.
 
You don’t ever let go of the thread. 
 
So I ask you: do you have such a thread? 
 
As we learn in meditation, holding on to things, such as the thread in this poem, tends to make things worse.
Rope burn as someone once remarked.
 
But maybe what’s being said is that holding on to our thread can keep us from getting lost in the darkness that can swallow us up from time to time. The darkness of sadness, grief, looking ahead to our old age, considering the poignant and swift passing of time.
 
Or whatever darkness or challenges come up for you.
 
Maybe we need this thread in these uncertain times to find our way back home.
 
Maybe this thread can give us the ground we need under our feet to explore the darkness and see what it may have to teach us.
 
I lose track of the thread of my life quite often.
 
When I feel powerless against my fears.
 
My worries about our kids’ futures in this rapidly disappearing world.
 
And of course in the crazy 24/7 electronic and media distractions of this so-called advanced civilization.
 
The fear of uncertainty is just my mind’s grip on itself.
 
Can I relax this fear grip, but still hold gently onto the thread of mindfulness, or loving-kindness?
 
Can we meet the freshness of the moment that offers us generous helpings of both sorrow and joy?
 
Mindfulness is a wonderful solvent, allowing us to loosen these grips and open to the amazing possibilities right here and now.
 
I will leave you this week with a poem by Rumi.
 
Zero Circle 
 
Be helpless, dumbfounded,
 
Unable to say yes or no.
 
Then a stretcher will come from grace
 
To gather us up. 
 
We are too dull-eyed to see that beauty.
 
If we say we can, we’re lying.
 
If we say No, we don’t see it,
 
That No will numb us,
 
And shut tight our window onto spirit. 
 
So let us rather not be sure of anything,
 
Beside ourselves, and only that, so
 
Miraculous beings come running to help.
 
Crazed, lying in a zero circle, mute,
 
We shall be saying finally,
 
With tremendous eloquence, Lead us.
 
When we have totally surrendered to that beauty,
 
We shall be a mighty kindness.
 
 Can you surrender to the beauty before you right now, before the judging mind has a go with it?
 
 Katina and I are here to support your meditation practice in any way we can. 
 
Aloha,
 
Tom, Katina, Uilalani and Kupaianaha 
 
 
 


Sincerely,
Ron Richey
808-734-5732
439 Nahua Street #2
Honolulu, Hi 96815
iamronrichey@gmail.com
www.melloron.com

APRIL 28,2016 MINDFUL MOMENTS IN MANOA

Honolulu folks –> Join a supportive group of like-minded folks tonight 4/28/16, for meditation, mindful movement and discussion at our place, 3241 Alani Drive, in Manoa, at the usual time: 6 to 7:30 PM. If you have a meditation cushion please bring; if not, no worries. The front door opens at 5:50. Note: please do not park in the driveway, as we share this rented house with another couple and we do not want them to be blocked in. Thanks!
 
Dear friends,
As we develop experience in meditation, we begin to appreciate the ability to see what’s going on inside with greater clarity and humor.
 
When we hit a rough patch in a meditation session, such as restlessness or boredom, we can actually see how moods arise. This is a very useful skill, as in noticing ourselves identifying with moods, which are really just clusters of associated thoughts and images, we create a little space in which we can intervene before we are completely swept away.
 
To become a well-rounded meditator, I feel, it’s helpful to become familiar with a handful of meditative tools, and to have access to them in the moment.
 
For example, sometimes we may feel a melancholic mood coming over us, or a depressed one; and if we are alert, we can gain the direct realization of the ways of our deep mind.
 
When a melancholic cluster of thoughts or images enters, say, you may remember how this led to feelings such as “this meditation is going nowhere.”
 
This is an intimate “knowing” of an often unconscious pattern in your deep mind.
 
In time you gain a sense of what works to uplift your mind, brighten your mood, and bring fresh enthusiasm to the path.
 
You may feel this goes counter to instructions where we are simply attentive to moods in a nonjudgmental way, without wanting them to change.
 
Yes, of course …
 
But the Buddha also taught ways to “gladden the mind”– when we meditatively know we are going down a rabbit hole of unhealthy mind states, we see this is happening, and have the space and judgement to bring out an appropriate tool – such as reflection of loving-kindness, or an immediate dousing of our heart’s malaise in the sound of rain on the lanai’s tin roof.
 
Or the smell of white or yellow ginger in the yard.
 
Or contemplating the earth, as the Buddha taught his own son, Rahula.
 
Meditate, instructed, so that your mind is like earth. Lots of disagreeable stuff gets tossed on the earth, buried in the earth, yet the earth isn’t offended. When you make your mind like earth, all the scary, yucky, embarrassing, lusty thoughts can more easily, organically compost.
 
But this can get tricky at first. It just takes time for you to be unmistakably aware of your own inner landscape.
To see when that when this mind state comes up, it leads to this.
 
To see when just pure mindfulness, plain and simple, works for you in the rough patches.
 
And when it’s time to bring out a time tested tool to gladden the mind, in the Buddha’s phrasing. This often means that you have to explore on your own, to try this and that at times, and learn for yourself what works when.
 
One Buddhist monk, I think it was Ajahn Bram, said “You need to learn how to read your own mind.”
 
I will leave you with two passages from talks by another well-known Western born monk, Ajahn Thanissaro, on the spirit of the teachings the Buddha gave on gladdening the mind:
 
 
So when the path starts getting discouraging and the mind starts feeling dry, these are things you can think about to remind yourself that you’re on a good path. It may be a long path, but it’s a lot better than not being on a path at all, or on a path that requires compromises in terms of your ideals, in terms of your sense of what’s right and honorable, and then yields a happiness that laughs in your face and runs away.
 
And –
 
For instance, there will be times in your meditation when things aren’t going as well as you’d like. In cases like that, it can be helpful to go outside and look at the beauty of nature around you — the clouds, the sunset, the moon and the stars at night — to help clear and refresh your mind. There are passages in the Canon where Maha Kassapa, who was one of the strictest and sternest of the Buddha’s disciples, talks about the beauty of nature. The constant refrain in his verses is of how the hills, the mountains bathed in rain, and the jungle refresh him. Some of the first wilderness poetry in the world is in the Pali Canon — an appreciation of the beauties of not just nature but of wild nature. That sort of appreciation is part of the skill in learning how to gladden the mind.
 
Learn to read you own mind.
 
Experiment with meditative tools and reflections that have worked wonders for those who have walked this amazing path before us.
 
And don’t be afraid to be bold, to gently investigate your own mind, and step into the never dispiriting stream radical freedom, here and now.
 
Katina and I are here to support your meditation practice in any way we can.
Aloha, Tom, Katina, Uilalani and Kupaianaha
 
 
 
 
If the spirit moves you, please help spread the word about mindfulness meditation by:
 
–>> sharing this email with friends who may be interested or
 
–>> following us on our new Facebook Page  where there are other goodies or
 
–>> checking out our blog with other stuff like this to read
 


Sincerely,
Ron Richey
808-734-5732
439 Nahua Street #2
Honolulu, Hi 96815
iamronrichey@gmail.com
www.melloron.com

APRIL 21,2016 MINDFUL MOMENTS IN MANOA

Honolulu folks –> Join a supportive group of like-minded folks tonight 4/21/16, for meditation, mindful movement and discussion at our place, 3241 Alani Drive, in Manoa, at the usual time: 6 to 7:30 PM. If you have a meditation cushion please bring; if not, no worries. The front door opens at 5:50. Note: please do not park in the driveway, as we share this rented house with another couple and we do not want them to be blocked in. Thanks!
Ron,
Have you ever come home after a busy day and found the latest Costco coupon book with their latest items on sale?

And have you ever not really been waiting for a sale on something, like the printer that died last week that you need to replace soon … and, well you sit down with anticipation and start looking at stuff because, maybe, just maybe, you want to want something?

Or have you ever, perhaps a little while after a really good good meal, fully satiated, decided it was time to do some dishes, but on the way to the sink, you stop at the fridge … and opened it to look around? Thinking maybe there is something new in here I don’t know about?

Or have you ever been angry about something that happened in your day, but then got super busy and made a mental note that you would get back and chew on the incident some more … but you forgot what it was … but you were still angry?

Maybe in that case you start to think of justifications as to why you are still angry, and come up with a list that is clearly irrelevant to anything that happened today?

I am guilty on all 3 counts.

It doesn’t matter if it’s just wanting something, like a half of one of those yummy-looking muffins that just showed up in the fridge when you were already full, or wanting to sink your teeth into some juicy details “explaining” to you why you just seem generally pissed off today – we seem to be carried around by our unexamined thoughts.

These examples are all pretty innocuous and harmless. But hang in here with me…

The brain weighs about three pounds, which isn’t that much when you think about it. But it believes it speaks the absolute truth to us every moment of our busy, over stimulated, and often over caffeinated, lives. It speaks to us through thoughts.

And these thoughts are often under the horizon of our conscious awareness. Mindfulness meditation allows us to “sneak behind enemy lines” –yes, a little harsh here, insinuating the mind is an “enemy” – but truly, is the unexamined mind is really such a good friend?

For many of us, with complicated personal histories, the mind we start this journey with, is often an unreliable authority.

Can see the implications here? Thoughts happen just like that. We often believe what they say automatically, without a “second thought.”

Would you buy a used car this way?

You can see, right? – That this unexamined, wholesale accession to what our mind comes up with moment by moment is, shall we say, risky?

As the wise ones of old would say, the mind is a good servant, but a bad master.

The unexamined mind, that is.

It doesn’t take much to see, when we take the unexamined mind to be our master, how conflicts arise, how marriages fail, how workplaces become toxic …

Our simple meditation practice shows us front and center that our mind seems to nearly always be involved with something.

As we settle in meditation, perhaps bring attention to the breath or the touch sensations on the cushion, floor or chair, we begin to see more and more clearly that this mind is quite adept and sneaking out the back door.

One instant it could be making a dash for something it really wants, like those muffins, or getting revenge in some office drama fantasy. The next it gets sucked into remorseful thoughts about your choice of career, current romantic interest, or credit card debt.

Then it’s back to our friend anger.

Our mind seems to be perpetually busy keeping track of this and that. And sometimes we lose track and can’t remember how we got to where we are.

Then sometimes the meditation session leader rings the bell .. and oh, yes, I have been sitting here with my eyes closed for 30 minutes.

Relax .. this happens to everybody.

The way to rest our over-stimulated mind is just to let go of all thoughts about our thoughts.

We can simply relax as our thoughts come and go.

This advice from Dza Kilung Rinpochen is priceless.

Please take it to heart.

“If you have only five or ten minutes to spare, that helps a lot. You don’t have to be an excellent mediater to start with. All you need to do is have your heart and mind make the following agreement: “Let’s rest. There’s no reason right now to wander around following thoughts or to be worrying. Let’s be relaxed and open.” There’s not even any need to shut down your thoughts. Just be there with them, but not overly concerned or engaged. Let there be total openness, and just relax within that.”
And I would only add:
Right now.

Katina and I are here to support your meditation practice in any way we can.

Aloha,

Tom, Katina, Uilalani and Kupaianaha

If the spirit moves you, please help spread the word about mindfulness meditation by:

–>> sharing this email with friends who may be interested or

–>> following us on our new Facebook Page where there are other goodies or

–>> checking out our blog with other stuff like this to read

“Paying regular visits to yourself”

Tonight, Thursday 4/14/16 we are delighted to have a very special guest teacher, the American Buddhist nun, Venerable Karma Lekshe Tsomo, Ph.D. who lead a session of meditation and give a talk on “Lovingkindness in Theory and Practice”. Her bio appear below.

We will not have our usual mindful movement session in order to take advantage of this special occasion. The evening will begin at 6:00 PM with meditation, followed by the talk. There will be ample time for Q and A.

For more information about our very special guest teacher, and an upcoming talk she will be giving on Sunday, April 17, at 2 pm at Chaminade University, please see below.

Dear friends,
Joan Baez once said:
“You don’t get to choose when and how you die, but you do get to choose how you live now.”

This simple point always gets me.

And from the early teachers of Judaism as recorded in the Talmud:

“Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly now. Love mercy now. Walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, nor are you free to abandon it.”

This path is really about how we choose to live now.

We need to renew our commitment every moment to “love mercy now” and to “walk humbly now.”

And to do this well, we need to be alert and awake to what is going on inside us as continuously as we can, so if we notice we are getting irritated at something or someone, we can warn ourselves so we don’t trip ourselves up.

Our wonderful meditation practice allows us to cultivate this capacity to be alert and awake to our deepest aspirations for ourselves and others – and also see how we sometime stray.

With practice we can make nearly effortless, daily little mid-course corrections.

We need this practice, our mindfulness practice, of “paying regular visits to yourself” — as Rumi describes:
“We meet at this appointed time.

You’ve read where it says that

Lovers pray constantly.

Once a day, once a week, five times an hour,

Is not enough. Fish like us

Need the ocean around us.

Do camel-bells say, Let’s meet again

Thursday night?

Ridiculous. They jingle

Together continuously,

Talking while the camel walks.

Do you pay regular visits to yourself?

Don’t argue or answer rationally.

And dying, reply.”

Can you “jingle together continuously” as you go about your life, your mindfulness and you?

Katina and I are here to support your meditation practice in any way we can.

Aloha,
Tom, Katina, Uilalani and Kupaianaha

MINDFUL MOMENTS ON MANOA 4-6-16

Honolulu folks –> Join a supportive group of like-minded folks tomorrow night 4/7/16, for meditation, mindful movement and discussion at our place, 3241 Alani Drive, in Manoa, at the usual time: 6 to 7:30 PM. If you have a meditation cushion please bring; if not, no worries. The front door opens at 5:50. Note: please do not park in the driveway, as we share this rented house with another couple and we do not want them to be blocked in. Thanks!

Dear friends,

Katina and I and the kids are delighted to announce a special evening with guest speaker Ven. Karma Lekshe Tsomo, who will be leading the meditation and giving a talk on Loving-kindness in Theory and Practice, at our place on Thursday April 14, at the usual time, 6 to 7:30 PM.

I would also like to let you know about a free public event in which she will be presenting on Sunday, April 17, 2016 at 2 PM.

Ven. Lekshe will be giving a talk at the Mystical Rose Oratory on the Chaminade University campus. For more information about this event, and to read Ven. Lekshe’s bio, please see below.
~ ~ ~ ~
Our daughter is going off to college in the fall. Sometimes I ask how this could be, it seems like only yesterday I was cleaning out Sippy bottles, teaching her how to swing on a swing set, and to tie her shoes.

Now I am teaching her to drive and how to find her way at airports as she gets ready to take an unaccompanied flight to the Mainland to attend an admitted student’s college orientation.

As I reflect on the very early years, I am struck at the similarities between meditation and the parenting of a young child.

It’s really a lot about Not Knowing, or Beginner’s Mind.

Not Knowing, or Beginner’s Mind, reminds us that clinging to certainty, although natural, can cause us a lot of grief and confusion. Both in parenting and in meditation it can interfere with the innate ability blossom and thrive.

We bought all those parenting books first time parents buy. But no matter which or how many books you buy or online forums you sign up for, you go into this job mostly not really knowing what you are in for.

Same with meditation.

We are mostly raised to know what we are doing. You go to a trade school, or college, maybe graduate school, all to know what you are doing. So we can have a safe sense of being in control our lives, professional, familial, and personal.

In parenting and meditation, in order to get the fruits hope for, we need to remind ourselves when we have strayed from Not Knowing mind, and gently come back.

Come back to what? — A letting be and a letting go of any of any preconceived ideas and the notion that we have control over how things are.

When we come from a place of certainty, we are may not be fully alive to what stands outside of our preconceived ideas. If we enter parenting with a rigid stance about how things should be, we may not only dismiss who our children are and who they are becoming, but we cloud our ability to allow our children and our experience to be our teachers.

Same with meditation.

As Suzuki Roshi said:

“Not-knowing does not mean you don’t know.” Not-knowing means not being limited by what we know, holding what we know lightly so that we are ready for it to be different. Maybe things are this way. But maybe they are not.”

But we are not talking about deliberately trying to be confused or in doubt about how to be a good parent or a good meditator, or to simply not know how to do either.

In of his talks, Gil Fronsdal notes that while doubt and uncertainty are involuntary states, “not-knowing-mind“ is a conscious practice in which we cultivate an ability to meet life without preconceived ideas, interpretations, or judgments.

We simply notice thoughts of certainty as they arise and see if we can “soften the edges” as Gil says.

We try to remain open to the possibility of things being different than how we expected them to be, moment by mindful moment.

As Gil pus it:

“As a Buddhist practice, not-knowing leads to more than an intimacy and open mind. It can be used as a sword to cut through all the ways that the mind clings. If we can wield this sword until the mind lets go of itself and finally knows ultimate freedom, then-not knowing has served its ultimate purpose.”

Try it now

Katina and I are here to support your meditation practice in any way we can.
Aloha,
Tom, Katina, Uilalani and Kupaianaha

May the clay dance to balance you |

May the clay dance to balance you | We meditate tonight 3/31/16

 
Honolulu folks –> Join a supportive group of like-minded folks tonight 3/31/16, for meditation, mindful movement and discussion at our place, 3241 Alani Drive, in Manoa, at the usual time: 6 to 7:30 PM. If you have a meditation cushion please bring; if not, no worries. The front door opens at 5:50. Note: please do not park in the driveway, as we share this rented house with another couple and we do not want them to be blocked in. Thanks!
 
Dear friends,
 
Just a few thoughts about the spiritual attitudes invoked in the act of blessing:
*in blessing ourselves in every moment we are mindful, when we wake up from the trance of what psychologists call “cognitive affective automaticity” or what most people on the planet call their day to day lives,
*in coming home from mental time travel sparked by the bombardment sensory input and unhealthy pace of our digital and real lives
* in our day to day interactions, wishing others well in this unrepeatable, oh-too-short life
* in recognizing we all belong to, as the Japanese saying goes, the “nose hole society” of our shared human-ness

Buddhist monks begin each day with a chant of gratitude for the blessings of their life.
 
Native American elders begin each ceremony with grateful prayers to mother earth and father sky, to the four directions, to the animal, plant, and mineral brothers and sisters who share our earth and support our life.
 
In Tibet, the monks and nuns even offer prayers of gratitude for the suffering they have been given: 
“Grant that I might have enough suffering to awaken in the deepest possible compassion and wisdom.”
 
The aim of spiritual life I feel is to awaken a joyful freedom, a benevolent and compassionate heart in spite of everything this crazy life throws at us.

I honestly can’t remember who said that gratitude is confidence in life itself.
Quite a statement.
I have my suspicions it was Brother David Steindl-Rast
 
The simple gratitude expressed in the act of blessing allows us to touch joy.
 
Not just any joy, but the joy in the deepest core of our being, the joy of creation itself.
 
And as our joy grows we finally discover a happiness without cause.
 
Like an innocent child who does not have to do anything to be happy, we can rejoice in life itself, in being alive.
 
When our kids were young, I would be continually blown away when I would come home after not seeing them and they would almost squeal with glee–
 
“Daddy!”
 
It would floor me.
 
Such a natural, unequivocal expression of joy at just seeing me was almost too much to bear.
 
Lots for me to ponder there for me.
 
But let’s allow you to ponder these:
 
 “If we cannot be happy in spite of our difficulties,
what good is our spiritual practise?”
~Maha Ghosananda
 
       ~ 
 
“Whenever you become aware of having a negative thought about someone,
stop and bless the person instead. Say,
“I send you a blessing that all the goodness you desire comes into your life.
I bless you for health and well-being.”
 
You can bless and enhance activities and projects as well.
When you offer the work you do a blessing, or bless a project you or someone else is involved in, you are taking time to send powerful, loving energy to it. As you regularly practise offering blessings to others and to yourself, you will be amazed at how your health, well-being, and joy in life will be enhanced.”
Brenda Shoshanna PhD — Fearless: The Principles of Peace of Mind
 
“Prayer is also referred to as mist. The Talmud says,
‘A mist goes up to heaven.’
Just like mist, prayers go up and activate the flow of spiritual sustenance.
This sustenance is then called down into your life and the life of others through prayer.
Ultimately the work of Jewish practice and prayer is to elevate and bless the entire world.”
from Jewish Dharma: A Guide to the Practice of Judaism and Zen
 
 
 
In closing, a poem by someone I adore, but never met.
He passed away a couple of years ago, way too early.
 
John O’Donohue, the Celtic mystic and poet.
(It may be helpful to know that a “currach” is a type of Irish boat).
The poet wrote these lines for his mother as she passed away in his arms.
He passed away just a few years later, from a chronic illness.  
You can find more information on O’Donohue’s life and work at http://www.johnodonohue.com.
 
 
 
Beannacht – For Josie
 
On the day when
 
The weight deadens
 
On your shoulders
 
And you stumble,
 
May the clay dance
 
To balance you.
 
 
 
And when your eyes
 
Freeze behind
 
The grey window
 
And the ghost of loss
 
Gets into you,
 
May a flock of colours,
 
Indigo, red, green
 
And azure blue,
 
Come to awaken in you
 
A meadow of delight.
 
 
 
When the canvas frays
 
In the currach of thought
 
And a stain of ocean
 
Blackens beneath you,
 
May there come across the waters
 
A path of yellow moonlight
 
To bring you safely home.
 
 
 
May the nourishment of the earth be yours,
 
May the clarity of light be yours,
 
May the fluency of the ocean be yours,
 
May the protection of the ancestors be yours.
 
 
 
And so may a slow
 
Wind work these words
 
Of love around you,
 
An invisible cloak
 
To mind your life.
 
 
 
     ~
 
 
 
 
Katina and I are here to support your meditation practice in any way we can.
 
Aloha,
 
Tom, Katina, Uilalani and Kupaianaha

THURSDAY EVENING IN MANOA 3-24-16

Dear friends: this is an occasional email with notes from our weekly Thursday meditation get-togethers, sent out when members request the notes. These are not prose style emails, just notes. Please join us on Thursdays for meditation, movement and talk-story from 6 to 7:30 pm, at our place at 3241 Alani Drive, in Manoa — always free, beginners welcome, tell your friends. We meet this ThursdayThursDY

Expectation is the juncture of where you right now and where you think you want to be, or want to have happen.

In meditation a huge block arises when we have subtle and not-so-subtle expectations of how our meditation should be progressing in the long run, to say nothing of expecting how it should be today as you sit down to meditate.

When explored in meditation, often we find our expectations to be little off. This is sometimes called confusion or delusion.

How much of our day to day thinking is a little off?

Expectations can tie us up if we don’t see how we have bought in to them as they nail us down to past/ future.

Holidays, vacations, a new car…pictures in the mind around family reunions.

Endless creative possibilities are always in the now space, not past/ future.

Beginners mind and being in the now space.

Suzuki Roshi: “In the mind of experts, there are few possibilities; in the mind of beginners, there are many.”

Meditation — recognizing and seeing through expectations and staying in the creative now space.
A little lightness and humor helps–>>

Ram Dass: As we get to now our inner stuff (like expectations) we become “connoisseurs of our own neurosis.”

Seeing though and letting go of expectations gently helps us into a mental framework called equanimity (upekkha).

Jack Kornfield: “Equanimity allows us to see the woven pattern of both suffering and joy in our lives and in the world.”

Walt Whitman:

I exist as I am, that is enough,
If no other in the world be aware I sit content,
And if each and all be aware I sit content.
One world is aware and by far the largest to me, and that is
myself,
And whether I come to my own to-day or in ten thousand or
ten million years,
I can cheerfully take it now, or with equal cheerfulness I can
wait. Excerpts from “Song of Myself” by Walt Whitman.

Have a lovely Easter!
tom, Katina, Uilalani, and Kupainaha Marx


Sincerely,
Ron Richey
808-734-5732
439 Nahua Street #2
Honolulu, Hi 96815
iamronrichey@gmail.com
www.melloron.com

MINDFUL MOMENTS IN MANOA 3-21-16 

Dear friends,
Here are the notes from last Thursday’s mindfulness get-together

–>> Theme: the flow state

In some ways, one aspect of meditation is seeing through the meditator or letting go of the meditator and entering what is often called a flow state.  The flow state has been recognized by many people in all sorts of aspects of life.  People who do 10,000 hours worth of activity—a violinist, an athlete, a dancer—certain kinds of work and activity, once you master a certain external technique you can enter this state of being able to do that with your eyes open in the midst of activity and you feel connected to everyone.  
 
You feel like you’re relaxed and open, you feel like time slows down, you feel a sense of boundless quality, and you feel a sense of ease and well-being—no worries, no fear.  And, you are able to live in this world with your eyes open, not just on a cushion, in a way that would be considered one of the highest or best states of well-being. There’s happiness, joy, there’s a peace, there’s a sense of engagement with the world. 
 
–>> Short Readings
 
“I would like to live the way a river flows:
Carried out by the surprise of its own unfolding.”
~ John O’Donohue ~
 
Do not try to become anything.
Do not make yourself into anything.
Do not be a meditator.
Do not become enlightened.
When you sit, let it be.
When you walk, let it be.
Grasp at nothing.
Resist nothing.
 ~ Ajahn Chah ~
 
 

What comes, will go.

What is found, will be lost again.

But what you are is beyond

coming and going and

beyond description.

You are It.

~Rumi~

 
 Once you realize that the road is the goal,
and that you are always on the road,
not to reach a goal but to enjoy its beauty and its wisdom,
life ceases to be a task and becomes natural and simple.
In itself an ecstasy.
 ~ Nisargadatta Maharaj ~
 
Sending you lots of metta and aloha,Tom and family
Sincerely,
Ron Richey
808-734-5732
439 Nahua Street #2
Honolulu, Hi 96815
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www.melloron.com