From the BlogMeet Ron

OCT.17,2017 OUR GROUP 23 OF MORNING HOTSHOTS

OCT.17,2017 OUR GROUP 23 OF MORNING HOTSHOTS
DAILY

Neither Dependence nor Self-Sufficiency
When we insisted, like infants, that people protect and take care of us or that the world owed us a living, then the result was unfortunate. The people we most loved often pushed us aside or perhaps deserted us entirely. Our disillusionment was hard to bear. We failed to see that, though adult in years, we were still behaving childishly, trying to turn everybody – friends, wives, husbands, even the world itself – into protective parents. We refused to learn that overdependence upon people is unsuccessful because all people are fallible, and even the best of them will sometimes let us down, especially when our demands for attention become unreasonable. 
<<< >>> 
We are now on a different basis: the basis of trusting and relying upon God. We trust infinite God rather than our finite selves. Just to the extent that we do as we think He would have us do, and humbly rely on Him, does He enable us to match calamity with serenity. 
1. TWELVE AND TWELVE, p. 115 
2. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 68
======================================
Vernon Howard’s SECRETS OF LIFE 
 
 
“LOVING INVITATION  A sign is displayed at the exit of the hall at
New Life Foundation. Its large letters are read by all who leave
after a lecture. The sign reads:
WHEN YOUR PAIN GETS TOO BAD, COME BACK
A loving invitation! The hurt and the confused are invited to return
to allow Truth to set them free. Accept this invitation for yourself.
Return often to the Higher View. It changes sour to sweet. See Guide 7.”
Women – 50 Ways to See Thru Men (for Men too), # 10
===================================
DAILY REFLECTIONS OCT.17, 2017
 
A DAILY TUNE-UP
Every day is a day when we must carry the vision of God’s will into all of our activities.
— ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 85
How do I maintain my spiritual condition? For me it’s quite simple: on a daily basis I ask my Higher Power to grant me the gift of sobriety for that day! I have talked to many alcoholics who have gone back to drinking and I always ask them: “Did you pray for sobriety the day you took your first drink?” Not one of them said yes. As I practice Step Ten and try to keep my house in order on a daily basis, I have the knowledge that if I ask for a daily reprieve, it will be granted.
From the book Daily Reflections
Copyright © 1990 by 
Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
==============================
Wake up! Your word is all powerful. Your consciousness is one with Omnipotence. Your thought is infinite. Your destiny is eternal and your home is everlasting heaven
Ernest HolmesCreative Thought
 
Today gratitude is the rush that I chase. 
Anonymous 
 
I rise to taste the dawn, and find that love alone will shine today.
KEN WILBER
 
 
Let the beauty we love be what we do.
RUMI
A COURSE IN MIRACLES INSIGHTS
ACIM Workbook Lesson 292 Insights
“A happy outcome to all things is sure.”
The only reason we seem to have problems is because we think the ego thought system (alien will) is real. As long as we believe that, we are clueless about what is actually real. We have no idea of the Love and joy that is ours because they are God’s Will. We flounder around in a world of chaos and uncertainty, oblivious to the happiness God has in store for us. But we do not have to be stuck in this belief system. We need only ask for God’s help to give us the strength and certainty to not interfere with His Will.
 
Because the ego believes in sin and punishment, the ego tells us that God’s Will for us is punishment and that He will demand sacrifice of us if we “yield” to His Will. The ego has us convinced that it is God’s Will that is alien to us. Yet in truth, we share God’s Will. It is the ego’s will that is alien. The ego’s view of God’s Will is simply a projection of the ego’s belief in sin, punishment and sacrifice.
 
Again and again the Course tells us in different ways that God’s Will for us is perfect happiness. It seems hard to believe because in our identification with the ego we have never experienced a wholly benevolent will. Our lives are filled with suspicion and doubt. It seems that even our best friends have the potential to turn on us and become our enemies. This is because the relationships we have in this world are based on specialness that is ever changing. God’s Love is unknown in this world, because this world was made to keep Love out. By the grace of God, this need not be. He has given us a healing dream that helps us let go of the fearful world we think we have made. This healing dream is the dream of forgiveness. There would be no need for forgiveness if we did not believe in sin and condemnation. But the illusion of forgiveness is used to help us let go of the guilt and the accompanying fear that comes with the belief that we have separated from Love.
 
We have help with forgiveness. We need only ask for this help and the strength of God is ours. It is with His strength that we forgive. It is available to us in every moment. A happy outcome is assured because only happiness is real. Forgiveness lets go of the interference that blinds us to the joy and love that is ever present.
 
Holy Spirit, I ask your help today to let go of the interference, so that I may recognize the happy endings promised me for every problem I perceive.
 
 
The sentence that stands out to me in this lesson is, “Help us not to interfere, and so delay the happy endings You have promised for us for every problem that we can perceive, for every trial we think we still must meet.” (2:2) How do I not interfere with the happy ending? Day by day I practice being mindful of the ego’s thought system. I observe it and hand it over to the Holy Spirit for a changed perception.
 
I practice stepping back from what I think I already know and ask to be shown the truth. I let go of thinking I know anything. I ask for the peace of God and open my mind to receive it. I give times during the day to quiet my mind and leave it open for Holy Spirit’s inspiration. I practice resting in peace, resting in God’s Love, resting in the remembrance that only Love is real. I ask often, “What would you have me do, where would you have me go, what you have me say and to whom?”
 
I remember that guilt is what makes the world go round and delays the happy outcome. I watch for the times when I am tempted to believe that guilt is real. As soon as I see it, I hand it to the Holy Spirit and ask for a new perception because I have had enough of the alien will. It has not brought me happiness. Separation is really hell. I do not know how to get out of hell, but the Holy Spirit in my mind does. And so day by day, I practice taking all my perceptions of separation to the Holy Spirit to be undone.
 
As long as I continue to believe in the reality of separate bodies with separate minds, I have more to hand over to the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit shows me in each instance the unreality of my perceptions. The Holy Spirit shows me the undivided Love that is behind each perception of separation. Whenever I think I have a problem, the Holy Spirit shows me that there is another way of looking at it.
Holy Spirit, help me not interfere and so delay the happy endings.
© 2003, Pathways of Light. http://pathwaysoflight.org
You may freely share copies of this with your friends, 
provided this copyright notice and website address are included.
=================================
Remain calm, serene, always in command of yourself. You will then find out how easy it is to get along.
Paramahansa Yogananda
============================

The great nutrient collapse

The atmosphere is literally changing the food we eat, for the worse. And almost nobody is paying attention.

By HELENA BOTTEMILLER EVICH 09/13/2017 05:03 AM EDT

 

Irakli Loladze is a mathematician by training, but he was in a biology lab when he encountered the puzzle that would change his life. It was in 1998, and Loladze was studying for his Ph.D. at Arizona State University. Against a backdrop of glass containers glowing with bright green algae, a biologist told Loladze and a half-dozen other graduate students that scientists had discovered something mysterious about zooplankton.

 

Zooplankton are microscopic animals that float in the world’s oceans and lakes, and for food they rely on algae, which are essentially tiny plants. Scientists found that they could make algae grow faster by shining more light onto them—increasing the food supply for the zooplankton, which should have flourished. But it didn’t work out that way. When the researchers shined more light on the algae, the algae grew faster, and the tiny animals had lots and lots to eat—but at a certain point they started struggling to survive. This was a paradox. More food should lead to more growth. How could more algae be a problem?

Loladze was technically in the math department, but he loved biology and couldn’t stop thinking about this. The biologists had an idea of what was going on: The increased light was making the algae grow faster, but they ended up containing fewer of the nutrients the zooplankton needed to thrive. By speeding up their growth, the researchers had essentially turned the algae into junk food. The zooplankton had plenty to eat, but their food was less nutritious, and so they were starving.

 

Loladze used his math training to help measure and explain the algae-zooplankton dynamic. He and his colleagues devised a model that captured the relationship between a food source and a grazer that depends on the food. They published that first paper in 2000. But Loladze was also captivated by a much larger question raised by the experiment: Just how far this problem might extend.

 

“What struck me is that its application is wider,” Loladze recalled in an interview. Could the same problem affect grass and cows? What about rice and people? “It was kind of a watershed moment for me when I started thinking about human nutrition,” he said.

 

In the outside world, the problem isn’t that plants are suddenly getting more light: It’s that for years, they’ve been getting more carbon dioxide. Plants rely on both light and carbon dioxide to grow. If shining more light results in faster-growing, less nutritious algae—junk-food algae whose ratio of sugar to nutrients was out of whack—then it seemed logical to assume that ramping up carbon dioxide might do the same. And it could also be playing out in plants all over the planet. What might that mean for the plants that people eat?

 

What Loladze found is that scientists simply didn’t know. It was already well documented that CO2levels were rising in the atmosphere, but he was astonished at how little research had been done on how it affected the quality of the plants we eat. For the next 17 years, as he pursued his math career, Loladze scoured the scientific literature for any studies and data he could find. The results, as he collected them, all seemed to point in the same direction: The junk-food effect he had learned about in that Arizona lab also appeared to be occurring in fields and forests around the world. “Every leaf and every grass blade on earth makes more and more sugars as CO2 levels keep rising,” Loladze said. “We are witnessing the greatest injection of carbohydrates into the biosphere in human history―[an] injection that dilutes other nutrients in our food supply.”

 

He published those findings just a few years ago, adding to the concerns of a small but increasingly worried group of researchers who are raising unsettling questions about the future of our food supply. Could carbon dioxide have an effect on human health we haven’t accounted for yet? The answer appears to be yes—and along the way, it has steered Loladze and other scientists, directly into some of the thorniest questions in their profession, including just how hard it is to do research in a field that doesn’t quite exist yet.

 

IN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH, it’s been understood for some time that many of our most important foods have been getting less nutritious. Measurements of fruits and vegetables show that their minerals, vitamin and protein content has measurably dropped over the past 50 to 70 years. Researchers have generally assumed the reason is fairly straightforward: We’ve been breeding and choosing crops for higher yields, rather than nutrition, and higher-yielding crops—whether broccoli, tomatoes, or wheat—tend to be less nutrient-packed.

 

In 2004, a landmark study of fruits and vegetables found that everything from protein to calcium, iron and vitamin C had declined significantly across most garden crops since 1950. The researchers concluded this could mostly be explained by the varieties we were choosing to grow.

 

Loladze and a handful of other scientists have come to suspect that’s not the whole story and that the atmosphere itself may be changing the food we eat. Plants need carbon dioxide to live like humans need oxygen. And in the increasingly polarized debate about climate science, one thing that isn’t up for debate is that the level of CO2 in the atmosphere is rising. Before the industrial revolution, the earth’s atmosphere had about 280 parts per million of carbon dioxide. Last year, the planet crossed over the 400 parts per million threshold; scientists predict we will likely reach 550 parts per million within the next half-century—essentially twice the amount that was in the air when Americans started farming with tractors.

 

If you’re someone who thinks about plant growth, this seems like a good thing. It has also been useful ammunition for politicians looking for reasons to worry less about the implications of climate change. Rep. Lamar Smith, a Republican who chairs the House Committee on Science, recently argued that people shouldn’t be so worried about rising CO2 levels because it’s good for plants, and what’s good for plants is good for us.

 

“A higher concentration of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere would aid photosynthesis, which in turn contributes to increased plant growth,” the Texas Republican wrote. “This correlates to a greater volume of food production and better quality food.”

 

But as the zooplankton experiment showed, greater volume and better quality might not go hand-in-hand. In fact, they might be inversely linked. As best scientists can tell, this is what happens: Rising CO2 revs up photosynthesis, the process that helps plants transform sunlight to food. This makes plants grow, but it also leads them to pack in more carbohydrates like glucose at the expense of other nutrients that we depend on, like protein, iron and zinc.

 

In 2002, while a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University, Loladze published a seminal research paper in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, a leading journal, arguing that rising CO2 and human nutrition were inextricably linked through a global shift in the quality of plants. In the paper, Loladze complained about the dearth of data: Among thousands of publications he had reviewed on plants and rising CO2, he found only one that looked specifically at how it affected the balance of nutrients in rice, a crop that billions of people rely on. (The paper, published in 1997, found a drop in zinc and iron.)

In a USDA research field in Maryland, researchers are running experiments on bell peppers to measure how vitamin C changes under elevated CO2. They’re also looking at coffee to see whether caffeine declines. “There are lots of questions,” Ziska said as he showed me around his research campus in Beltsville. “We’re just putting our toe in the water.”

Ziska is part of a small band of researchers now trying to measure these changes and figure out what it means for humans. Another key figure studying this nexus is Samuel Myers, a doctor turned climate researcher at Harvard University who leads the Planetary Health Alliance, a new global effort to connect the dots between climate science and human health.

Myers is also concerned that the research community is not more focused on understanding the CO2-nutrition dynamic, since it’s a crucial piece of a much larger picture of how such changes might ripple through ecosystems. “This is the tip of the iceberg,” said Myers. “It’s been hard for us to get people to understand how many questions they should have.”

In 2014, Myers and a team of other scientists published a large, data-rich study in the journal Nature that looked at key crops grown at several sites in Japan, Australia and the United States that also found rising CO2 led to a drop in protein, iron and zinc. It was the first time the issue had attracted any real media attention.

“The public health implications of global climate change are difficult to predict, and we expect many surprises,” the researchers wrote. “The finding that raising atmospheric CO2lowers the nutritional value of C3 crops is one such surprise that we can now better predict and prepare for.”

The same year―in fact, on the same day―Loladze, then teaching math at the The Catholic University of Daegu in South Korea, published his own paper, the result of more than 15 years of gathering data on the same subject. It was the largest study in the world on rising CO2 and its impact on plant nutrients. Loladze likes to describe plant science as ““noisy”―research-speak for cluttered with complicating data, through which it can be difficult to detect the signal you’re looking for. His new data set was finally big enough to see the signal through the noise, to detect the “hidden shift,” as he put it.

What he found is that his 2002 theory—or, rather, the strong suspicion he had articulated back then—appeared to be borne out. Across nearly 130 varieties of plants and more than 15,000 samples collected from experiments over the past three decades, the overall concentration of minerals like calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc and iron had dropped by 8 percent on average. The ratio of carbohydrates to minerals was going up. The plants, like the algae, were becoming junk food.

What that means for humans―whose main food intake is plants―is only just starting to be investigated. Researchers who dive into it will have to surmount obstacles like its low profile and slow pace, and a political environment where the word “climate” is enough to derail a funding conversation. It will also require entirely new bridges to be built in the world of science―a problem that Loladze himself wryly acknowledges in his own research. When his paper was finally published in 2014, Loladze listed his grant rejections in the acknowledgements.

Helena Bottemiller Evich is a senior food and agriculture reporter for POLITICO Pro.
============================

Sincerely,
Ron Richey
545 Queen St. #701
Honolulu, Hi 96813
Virus-free. www.avg.com

Sincerely,
Ron Richey
808-734-5732
545 Queen St. # 701
Honolulu, Hi 96813
iamronrichey@gmail.com
www.melloron.com

Speak Your Mind