From the BlogMeet Ron

SEPT.29,2016 MINDFUL MOMENTS IN MANOA

SEPT.29,2016 MINDFUL MOMENTS IN MANOA

 
Honolulu folks –> Join us for meditation tonight Thursday 9/2916, at our place, 3241 Alani Drive, in Manoa, at the usual time: 6 to 7:30 PM. If you have a meditation cushion please bring; if not, no worries. The front door opens at 5:50.
 
Please read the important message in the space below this weekly message about a new meditation center that is in the all-important foundation stage of development! 
Exciting times!
 
 
Dear friends,
One of the most difficult myths I have fun deconstructing in teaching mindfulness: meditation will magically vacuum my mind of thought and will take me to a special place where I will abide in bliss and profound revelations, forever. 
  And the corollary: all my problems with be resolved.
 
But in this short email, let’s just take on one part of this pesky fantasy: my mind will be vacuumed of thought.
 
Many of us are attracted to mindfulness meditation as a way of getting rid of bothersome patterns of thought which perpetuate anxiety, unrest, and subtle malaise. 
 
Sure, many of us not at all motivated in this way, and are just curious about mindfulness as a way of enhancing a life that is just fine, thanks.
 
Either way, the myth of the magically vacuumed mind persists.
 
When we get over the initial shock of just sitting and not doing much of anything, a little contentment starts to creep in, as we learn to let thoughts come and go. As psychologist Elisha Goldstein says:
 
 
It’s like being at a laundromat watching the clothes tumble in a big dryer. We don’t have to tumble along with the clothes; we can just watch them fall through space.
 
 
But thinking does not have to stop; we just need to get a little distance from thought so we don’t “tumble along with them.” Yes, thinking may slow down and thin out a little, but having the notion that an empty, vacuumed mind is the goal just sets you up for failure.
 
So what, then, is a reasonable goal?
 
I came across a phrase in the online magazine Shambhala Sun: 
 
 
“More dance, less straightjacket.”
 
 
It’s about allowing the mind to be more malleable and cooperative, more workable. 
 
About discovering that our mind doesn’t need to be vacuumed, or fixed, in any way.
 
In time we see that our mind is intrinsically brimming over with kindness, compassion, joy, and mindful delight. 
 
But to see that we need to practice a little at just letting things be as they are.
 
It’s also about being fascinated by the working of the mind. 
 
And you can’t be fascinated in this way with a mind magically vacuumed of thought (or emotion, wants, aversions, sensations, smells, memories, dreams…)
 
With patient practice we relish our life just as it is: messy, maybe a little broken here and there, but intrinsically and fundamentally fine.
 
I’ll let the poet Derek Walcott have the last words:
 
 
Love after Love 
 
The time will come 
when, with elation 
you will greet yourself arriving 
at your own door, in your own mirror 
and each will smile at the other’s welcome, 
 
and say, sit here. Eat. 
You will love again the stranger who was your self.
Give wine. Give bread. Give back your heart 
to itself, to the stranger who has loved you 
 
all your life, whom you ignored 
for another, who knows you by heart. 
Take down the love letters from the bookshelf, 
 
the photographs, the desperate notes, 
peel your own image from the mirror. 
Sit. Feast on your life.
 
 
 
Aloha, 
 
Tom, Katina, Kupaianaha … and Uilalani in NYC
 
 
 
The American Buddhist nun Karma Lekshe Tsomo, spiritual mentor to so many of us here in Hawai’i, is in need of help to complete the building of her pre-fabricated house in Kunia — the first step in establishing a meditation center for all of us here on our home Island!
 
If you are interested in lending a hand — it would be very welcome! 
 
Lekshe has given of herself so generously in this lifetime, establishing 15 educational institutes for under- privileged women in Asia and recently adopting an orphanage of 200 children in Bangladesh. 
 
She needs help his weekend! 
 
She has a person with carpentry skills to supervise but needs volunteers to help assemble and put this building up. They usually start at 10 in the morning. Please let Ven. Lekshe know if you can help by calling her at 858-525-5163. 
 
Please share this message with friends who may be able to help. 
 
The address to the work site is 65-670 Kaukonahua Rd. 
 
Directions: After Wahiawa, there’s a fork in the road: right to North Shore and left to Waialua. Take the left fork. After about 5 or 10 minutes, you can see a cream colored building on the left, than a red building on the right. Start looking for a wide shoulder and a gate on the right with a kapu sign inside. If the gate is closed, call Ven. Lekshe at 858-525-5163.
 
This is a prime time to show you Bodhisattva spirit!. Let’s all try to help our dear Ven. Lekshe-la get this meditation center started!


Sincerely,
Ron Richey
808-734-5732
3856A Claudine St.
Honolulu, Hi 96816
iamronrichey@gmail.com
www.melloron.com

Speak Your Mind